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The Biggest "Price Tag"

Posted by Jarred Riccadonna, Marketing Coordinator, fi360, Inc. on November 25, 2015

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In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers.  After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of establishing a village at Plymouth.  It wasn’t until 1863, in the midst of the Civil War, that President Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a national Thanksgiving Day to be held each November.

As we cherish this holiday with our friends, family, and loved ones, try to remember and appreciate the history that this holiday carries with it and not take it for granted.  That those very same friends and family that you’ve made cherished memories with are the best times—and ones you should be most thankful for—in your life.  From the time your child took their first step or said their first word, to the time you put an engagement ring on your loved one’s finger.  What about the time you walked up the aisle to accept your diploma, hearing the roars and cheers of those same family and friends?  Or the time you hit a difficult point in your life, only to have your friends and family there to support you and give whatever they can to improve your situation?  All of these moments (and many others) have helped mold you to be the person you are today.

Given that this is the second Thanksgiving without my grandfather since his passing, my family and I have made it an even larger effort to reflect on fun and memorable moments that we made with him.  We know and understand the value of togetherness and make the most of it, especially during the holidays.  We all know that life happens.  Everyone becomes busy.  Time and distance can set us apart.  However, we ensure this time of year allows us not to be or feel entirely segregated.  We go from several unique and individualized people to one unified family, taking the time to know and understand the real importance and history of Thanksgiving—the same as I am asking you and your family and friends to do.  Take time to thank and truly appreciate your mother- and father-in-law (no matter how difficult that may be at first), smile, laugh, and appreciate the time spent, even if you see them frequently.  Grow together and be a part of your family and friends' lives.

Again, please remember that the practice and art of humility, kind-heartedness, and loving one another is the epitome to which Thanksgiving was founded upon.  We need to always remember that, no matter what deals you’ll find in-store or online to help check off those Christmas lists, appreciating what you have and being a sincere and loving person to others carry the biggest “price tag” of them all, the very same price tag that the pilgrims and Indians harmoniously shared with one another 395 years ago.

We wish you safe travels to your family’s residence and may you have a wonderful Thanksgiving holiday!

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